Horse & Rider Weekly #13: Road safety with horses

Today’s post will be addressing one of the most dangerous places a horse and rider can ever visit: the road. It’s a worldwide danger and many horse and human deaths have happened in the past due to reckless drivers just blowing them out. So I’ll start with a important message to all drivers first:

Be considerate of others on the road, be it cyclists, drivers, horse riders, anyone. Remember, horses have a fight or flight reaction and if any car approaches at speeds that would set the horse’s reaction off, the horse will try to fight, or will take flight. And when it takes flight, it runs into places that are very harmful, and can result in serious injury, or even death, not only to the horse, but the human with the horse. SO PLEASE, DRIVE LIKE A HUMAN BEING AND BE CONSIDERATE!!!!!!

If there’s one thing doing outrides in Linbro Park has taught me, it’s road safety. And I’ve been on the main roads of Linbro park, where the speed limit is 40-50 Km/h but drivers are flying at 80, 90, and even 100 Km/h. So, below are some tips to keep you and your horse safe from monsters on the road.

  1. Try to stay on the sidewalk, and if possible, stay deeper in the sidewalk, furthest from the road.
  2. Try to avoid going out on the road alone, always try to have a group of at least 4 people.
  3. AVOID BICYCLE AND/OR PEDESTRIAN LANES!! ALWAYS RIDE IN THE SIDEWALK.
  4. If there’s a need to cross the road, always try to do so at a stop sign or a traffic light. If you have to do it in the middle of the road, wait until there’s no car in sight. Don’t take the slightest chance by thinking “that car is far, I’ll make it” rather wait 15 minutes then putting your and your horse’s life at risk!
  5. If you’re in a group and a rider falls off in the middle of the road, the other group members should immediately:
    A: Block the traffic at least 10 meters on either side of the fallen rider.
    B: One member should stay by the rider and watch the horse, and should see if help is needed. If there’s an instructor in the group, let him/her take this post, since all instructors have first aid knowledge. A NOTE TO INSTRUCTORS: WHEN GOING ON OUTRIDES, ALWAYS CARRY A FIRST AID KIT WITH YOU!! If there’s no instructor in the group, then:
    BA: Immediately call emergency services.
    BB: If there are properties near you, try to get a grown up from there to help you out.
    C: If the rider is okay help him/her back to his/her feet, help them in mounting back on, make sure they are comfortable before resuming traffic flow.
    D: Don’t worry about drivers going crazy. A rider’s safety is more important; traffic can wait. If there are more members in a group, then let them explain a few of the drivers what the situation is, so they know they are stopped for a valid reason. Also, who knows? One of them could be a qualified medic / doctor and can assist!
  6. If you’re in a group and a rider’s horse spooks in the middle of the road, the other members should immediately:
    A: Block traffic at least 10 meters on either side from the spooking horse.
    B: The other members should assist in calming the horse down, even if it means having to dismount and handing your horse over to another rider. Remember, it’s the road, so a little bit of inconvenience goes a long way!
  7. Practice emergency dismounting before hand. Just in case. But please, in the best interest of you and your horse, keep emergency dismounting as the last resort.

I think that’s all what I have to say on this topic.

P.S THIS TOPIC IS A REALLY IMPORTANT TOPIC, SO IF THERE’S ANY OTHER TIPS FROM YOUR SIDE, PLEASE SHARE THEM IN THE COMMENTS BELOW! YOU COULD SAVE SOMEONE’S LIFE!

With that, see you all next time.

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